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1. It has allowed many people to set up their own businesses. Some of these people are very young, even under the age of 18.The workplace … increasingly stressful for many people, with longer hours and polluted air in big cities.

2. Choose the right variant
The food that Ann is cooking in the kitchen delilcious.

3. Fill in the gaps in the text with the correct forms of the words.
CAREER CHOICE
We end up more … than we were at the beginning.

4. I … a very difficult day tomorrow. I need to prepare for the exam.
would have

5. Although the sun was shining, it was still cold, because it … hard for two hours.

6. Read the text and complete the gaps in the sentences with the words from the text. The are the largest minority in Ireland. There are about 25,000 Irish Travellers in Ireland and 1,300 in Northern Ireland. They are a little understood nomadic community, who have many difficulties to overcome if they are to survive as a culture and gain acceptance into Irish society. Among the challenges facing them are poverty and racism. The Irish Travellers are a distinct ethnic group which has existed for centuries. Often they are mistakenly considered part of the nomadic Romani, an ethnic group which originated in the region of India and is now widespread throughout Europe. But the are indigenous to Ireland, so the two cultures are not related. While both are nomadic, the Irish Travellers are Roman Catholic and speak a language that is theirs alone. They have their own culture, customs, traditions, and language. They are noted for their musical and storytelling abilities. In times past, they travelled by horse-drawn wagon in caravans, making camp along the way. Tinsmithing, horse trading and peddling were the major sources of income in those days. Tinsmiths were so prevalent among that the terms Tinker and Irish Traveller were used interchangeably. Today, Tinker is one of many names for Irish Travellers. Horses and wagons have given way to mobile homes pulled by motor vehicles. They continue their life on the road, but there are fewer places to stop and fewer places where they are welcome. Today, Irish Travellers mainly work in recycling. Changing needs of society and progress have eliminated the jobs that could support a culture on wheels. ... are poor, undereducated, and on the receiving end of discrimination. Their life expectancy is lower than average while their infant mortality rate is higher than average. As is the case with the Romani, the ...are seen by many as a group of immoral, ignorant criminals and con artists. People distrust their nomadic culture and their language, Shelta. Many think it's a secret language specifically developed as a tool to help the... trick innocent people. But this is not true. It is an old language, which has evolved with time and circumstances. Once heavily infused with Irish Gaelic, it is now infused with English.
They have low ... and their infant mortality rate is ...

7. Fill in the gaps in the text with the correct forms of the verbs.
I'm living in a small Hotel at the moment, but I … to a flat next week. I've asked a friend of mine to share it with me.

8. Egyptians left no written accounts as to the execution of mummification, so the scientists … to examine mummies and establish their own theories.

9. The internet offers other alternatives, such as working from home and online shopping. Today you … go out to buy goods or earn money.

10. How long … you … Kate?

11. Fill in the gaps in the text with the correct forms of the words.
Moreover, career choices cannot be made based on just a few criteria alone. Your job may carry great monetary … and perks.

12. What time … your friend … tomorrow?

13. The economic situation is already very bad and it … worse.

14. In spite of the fact that it … all day long, the match … and the stands were full of spectators.

15. … he … about the opera before?

16. Fill in the gaps in the text with the correct forms of the verbs.
I've been working as a manager since I ... and 1 find It really interesting.

17. I have lost my key again. I … things. I lose things too often.

18. We were extremely tired at the end of the journey. We … for more than 24 hours.

19. Read the texts again and decide which text mentions that homemaking ...
gave someone much freedom.

20. Catherine is studying law at the university, and so … Nick.

21. Read the texts and match them with the headings. There is one extra title.
I stayed at home until the youngest started school and then I went back to work part-time. The extra money was very helpful but I found it exhausting coping with the house and my job. What amazes me is how people cope working full-time, looking after a home and bringing up children. I am surrounded by people like this where I now live. They have big houses, new cars, fancy clothes, they refurnish every couple of years or so, take numerous holidays. But when are they actually at home to enjoy all this? From 6.30 am the cars start leaving. Kids are woken up at some early hour, then driven through busy traffic to be dropped off at the child minder. The parent then has to travel to work. What happens if there is a blip in this tight schedule? What if the child has a tantrum or the car won't start? Then in the evenings the process starts again in reverse. The kids are picked up from school where they are in an after school club, then put to bed almost as soon as they get home. Everyone is exhausted. Where is the benefit to all this?
a) The perfect job b) Never bored c) Exhausting for all d) Money or time? e) A role reversal f) Free evenings

22. Read the text and choose the best options to fill in the gaps.
HUMAN RIGHTS DAY O
n 10 December 1948, the United Nations General Assembly adopted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, which has become a (1) ... standard for defending and promoting human rights. Every year on 10 December, Human Rights Day marks the adoption of the Universal Declaration which states that «Human beings are born with (2) ... rights and fundamental freedoms». In 2006, Human Rights Day focused on (3) ... poverty as a matter of obligation, not of charity. Poverty is (4) ... by human rights violations. The links between human rights and poverty should be obvious: people whose rights are (5) ... are more likely to be poor. Generally they find it harder or impossible to participate in the labour market and have little or no access to (6) ... services and resources. Meanwhile, the poor in many societies cannot enjoy their rights to education, health and housing simply (7) ... they cannot afford them. And poverty affects all human rights: for example, low income can prevent people from accessing education, which in turn inhibits their participation in public life and their ability to influence the policies affecting them. Governments and those in a position of authority must (8) ... responsibility for dealing (9) ... poverty. The realisation of human rights — including the fight against poverty — is a duty, not a mere aspiration.

23. The first modern Olympics … in Athens more than a hundred years ago.

24. How long … this book? How many pages of this book …?

25. All in all, the internet is here to stay and whether it … our life is up to us.

26. We … to the top of Holborn Hill before I … that he was not smiling at all.

27. His grandfather … from his job a year ago.

28. Fill in the gaps in the text with the correct forms of the verbs.
Please, let me know and give him my best regards. I ... in Novgorod for three months and I’m enjoying life here very much.

29. At last Kate came. I … for two hours.

30. The weather … hotter and hotter.

31. Check to see if the job gives you what you want from a career. Passion is the key word in selecting a career. Select something because you feel passionate about it, not because it is the latest thing in the job market.
Read the text and choose the best options to fill in the gaps.
WIND ENERGY
Every day you can see the wind blowing and watch all of that wasted energy just floating away. A lot of energy is thought to be (25) ... and all you need to use it are a few wind turbines! Currently less than 1% of the Earth's energy needs are (26) ... by wind, with Denmark being the most wind-friendly producing 23% of its own energy needs from wind. The energy produced is totally clean and also one of the (27) ... around and it is able to produce (28) ... 18 times more energy than is consumed in its construction, (29) ... nuclear which is estimated at around five. People are often worried about the look of wind farms but what they often forget is that the land can still (30) ... for farming, with only 1% of the space being taken up by the wind turbines. One of the biggest (31) ... about wind turbines, is their effect on bats and birds. In Norway, nine out of ten sea eagles were killed by turbines. Bats too are a serious problem. Even the manufacturers of wind turbines are (32). concerned by the numbers of bats being. killed, prompting ongoing research.

32. After they … they cleared the table.

33. Read the text and complete the gaps in the sentences with the words from the text. The ... are the largest minority in Ireland. There are about 25,000... in Ireland and 1,300 in Northern Ireland. They are a little understood nomadic community, who have many difficulties to overcome if they are to survive as a culture and gain acceptance into Irish society. Among the challenges facing them are poverty and racism. The Irish Travellers are a distinct ethnic group which has existed for centuries. Often they are mistakenly considered part of the nomadic Romani, an ethnic group which originated in the region of India and is now widespread throughout Europe. But the ... are indigenous to Ireland, so the two cultures are not related. While both are nomadic, the ... are Roman Catholic and speak a language that is theirs alone. They have their own culture, customs, traditions, and language. They are noted for their musical and storytelling abilities. In times past, they travelled by horse-drawn wagon in caravans, making camp along the way. Tinsmithing, horse trading and peddling were the major sources of income in those days. Tinsmiths were so prevalent among Irish Travellers that the terms Tinker and Irish Traveller were used interchangeably. Today, Tinker is one of many names for .... Horses and wagons have given way to mobile homes pulled by motor vehicles. They continue their life on the road, but there are fewer places to stop and fewer places where they are welcome. Today, ... mainly work in recycling. Changing needs of society and progress have eliminated the jobs that could support a culture on wheels. ... are poor, undereducated, and on the receiving end of discrimination. Their life expectancy is lower than average while their infant mortality rate is higher than average. As is the case with the Romani, the... are seen by many as a group of immoral, ignorant criminals and con artists. People distrust their nomadic culture and their language, Shelta. Many think it's a secret language specifically developed as a tool to help the Irish Travellers trick innocent people. But this is not true. It is an old language, which has evolved with time and circumstances. Once heavily infused with Irish Gaelic, it is now infused with English.
Irish Travellers have mobile homes pulled ... now.

34. Check to see if the job gives you what you want from a career. Passion is the key word in selecting a career. Select something because you feel passionate about it, not because it is the latest thing in the job market.
Read the text and choose the best options to fill in the gaps.
WIND ENERGY Every day you can see the wind blowing and watch all of that wasted energy just floating away. A lot of energy is thought to be (25) ... and all you need to use it are a few wind turbines! Currently less than 1% of the Earth's energy needs are (26) ... by wind, with Denmark being the most wind-friendly producing 23% of its own energy needs from wind. The energy produced is totally clean and also one of the (27) ... around and it is able to produce (28) ... 18 times more energy than is consumed in its construction, (29) ... nuclear which is estimated at around five. People are often worried about the look of wind farms but what they often forget is that the land can still (30) ... for farming, with only 1% of the space being taken up by the wind turbines. One of the biggest (31) ... about wind turbines, is their effect on bats and birds. In Norway, nine out of ten sea eagles were killed by turbines. Bats too are a serious problem. Even the manufacturers of wind turbines are (32). concerned by the numbers of bats being. killed, prompting ongoing research.

35. Fill in the gaps in the text with the correct forms of the words.
CAREER CHOICE
He or she will then show you how all these things, combined, play a role in choosing a career. You can also learn about a career by interviewing people who are already in that profession. Once you have all the information you need, list out all the pros and cons of that particular job. Look at the various ... .

36. Fill in the gaps in the text with the correct forms of the verbs.
I'm learning Russian and l can already understand what people around me are talking about. «But I find it really difficult to speak Russian. I ... the course by the end of the year and hope I feel more confident with this language.

37. We called our friends in London yesterday to tell them about the reunion that we … .

38. At 10 o'clock in the morning on Wednesday Tom … a delegation in the office.

39. She … at the parcel long enough, before she … that it was for her brother.

40. Check to see if the job gives you what you want from a career. Passion is the key word in selecting a career. Select something because you feel passionate about it, not because it is the latest thing in the job market.
Read the text and choose the best options to fill in the gaps.
WIND ENERGY
Every day you can see the wind blowing and watch all of that wasted energy just floating away. A lot of energy is thought to be (25) ... and all you need to use it are a few wind turbines! Currently less than 1% of the Earth's energy needs are (26) ... by wind, with Denmark being the most wind-friendly producing 23% of its own energy needs from wind. The energy produced is totally clean and also one of the (27) ... around and it is able to produce (28) ... 18 times more energy than is consumed in its construction, (29) ... nuclear which is estimated at around five. People are often worried about the look of wind farms but what they often forget is that the land can still (30) ... for farming, with only 1% of the space being taken up by the wind turbines. One of the biggest (31) ... about wind turbines, is their effect on bats and birds. In Norway, nine out of ten sea eagles were killed by turbines. Bats too are a serious problem. Even the manufacturers of wind turbines are (32). concerned by the numbers of bats being. killed, prompting ongoing research.

41. Read the texts again and decide which text mentions that homemaking ...
prevented the family from having social life.

42. Read the text and complete the gaps in the sentences with the words from the text. The Irish Travellers are the largest minority in Ireland. There are about 25,000 Irish Travellers in Ireland and 1,300 in Northern Ireland. They are a little understood nomadic community, who have many difficulties to overcome if they are to survive as a culture and gain acceptance into Irish society. Among the challenges facing them are poverty and racism. The Irish Travellers are a distinct ethnic group which has existed for centuries. Often they are mistakenly considered part of the nomadic Romani, an ethnic group which originated in the region of India and is now widespread throughout Europe. But the Irish Travellers are indigenous to Ireland, so the two cultures are not related. While both are nomadic, the Irish Travellers are Roman Catholic and speak a language that is theirs alone. They have their own culture, customs, traditions, and language. They are noted for their musical and storytelling abilities. In times past, they travelled by horse-drawn wagon in caravans, making camp along the way. Tinsmithing, horse trading and peddling were the major sources of income in those days. Tinsmiths were so prevalent among Irish Travellers that the terms Tinker and Irish Traveller were used interchangeably. Today, Tinker is one of many names for Irish Travellers. Horses and wagons have given way to mobile homes pulled by motor vehicles. They continue their life on the road, but there are fewer places to stop and fewer places where they are welcome. Today, Irish Travellers mainly work in recycling. Changing needs of society and progress have eliminated the jobs that could support a culture on wheels. Irish Travellers are poor, undereducated, and on the receiving end of discrimination. Their life expectancy is lower than average while their infant mortality rate is higher than average. As is the case with the Romani, the Irish Travellers are seen by many as a group of immoral, ignorant criminals and con artists. People distrust their nomadic culture and their language, Shelta. Many think it's a secret language specifically developed as a tool to help the Irish Travellers trick innocent people. But this is not true. It is an old language, which has evolved with time and circumstances. Once heavily infused with Irish Gaelic, it is now infused with English.
Although both groups are nomadic, their cultures ...

43. Read the text and choose the best options to fill in the gaps.
HUMAN RIGHTS DAY
On 10 December 1948, the United Nations General Assembly adopted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, which has become a (1) ... standard for defending and promoting human rights. Every year on 10 December, Human Rights Day marks the adoption of the Universal Declaration which states that «Human beings are born with (2) ... rights and fundamental freedoms». In 2006, Human Rights Day focused on (3) ... poverty as a matter of obligation, not of charity. Poverty is (4) ... by human rights violations. The links between human rights and poverty should be obvious: people whose rights are (5) ... are more likely to be poor. Generally they find it harder or impossible to participate in the labour market and have little or no access to (6) ... services and resources. Meanwhile, the poor in many societies cannot enjoy their rights to education, health and housing simply (7) ... they cannot afford them. And poverty affects all human rights: for example, low income can prevent people from accessing education, which in turn inhibits their participation in public life and their ability to influence the policies affecting them. Governments and those in a position of authority must (8) ... responsibility for dealing (9) ... poverty. The realisation of human rights — including the fight against poverty — is a duty, not a mere aspiration.

44. When Mark arrived, the Johnsons … dinner, but stopped in order to talk to him.

45. Many football fans claimed that after «Real FC» … that important game it … no chance to win the championship.

46. Read the text and complete the gaps in the sentences with the words from the text. The Irish Travellers are the largest minority in Ireland. There are about 25,000 Irish Travellers in Ireland and 1,300 in Northern Ireland. They are a little understood nomadic community, who have many difficulties to overcome if they are to survive as a culture and gain acceptance into Irish society. Among the challenges facing them are poverty and racism. The Irish Travellers are a distinct ethnic group which has existed for centuries. Often they are mistakenly considered part of the nomadic Romani, an ethnic group which originated in the region of India and is now widespread throughout Europe. But the Irish Travellers are indigenous to Ireland, so the two cultures are not related. While both are nomadic, the Irish Travellers are Roman Catholic and speak a language that is theirs alone. They have their own culture, customs, traditions, and language. They are noted for their musical and storytelling abilities. In times past, they travelled by horse-drawn wagon in caravans, making camp along the way. Tinsmithing, horse trading and peddling were the major sources of income in those days. Tinsmiths were so prevalent among Irish Travellers that the terms Tinker and Irish Traveller were used interchangeably. Today, Tinker is one of many names for Irish Travellers. Horses and wagons have given way to mobile homes pulled by motor vehicles. They continue their life on the road, but there are fewer places to stop and fewer places where they are welcome. Today, Irish Travellers mainly work in recycling. Changing needs of society and progress have eliminated the jobs that could support a culture on wheels. Irish Travellers are poor, undereducated, and on the receiving end of discrimination. Their life expectancy is lower than average while their infant mortality rate is higher than average. As is the case with the Romani, the Irish Travellers are seen by many as a group of immoral, ignorant criminals and con artists. People distrust their nomadic culture and their language, Shelta. Many think it's a secret language specifically developed as a tool to help the Irish Travellers trick innocent people. But this is not true. It is an old language, which has evolved with time and circumstances. Once heavily infused with Irish Gaelic, it is now infused with English.
... are the two main problems of Irish Travellers.

47. Read the text and choose the best options to fill in the gaps.
HUMAN RIGHTS DAY
On 10 December 1948, the United Nations General Assembly adopted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, which has become a (1) ... standard for defending and promoting human rights. Every year on 10 December, Human Rights Day marks the adoption of the Universal Declaration which states that «Human beings are born with (2) ... rights and fundamental freedoms». In 2006, Human Rights Day focused on (3) ... poverty as a matter of obligation, not of charity. Poverty is (4) ... by human rights violations. The links between human rights and poverty should be obvious: people whose rights are (5) ... are more likely to be poor. Generally they find it harder or impossible to participate in the labour market and have little or no access to (6) ... services and resources. Meanwhile, the poor in many societies cannot enjoy their rights to education, health and housing simply (7) ... they cannot afford them. And poverty affects all human rights: for example, low income can prevent people from accessing education, which in turn inhibits their participation in public life and their ability to influence the policies affecting them. Governments and those in a position of authority must (8) ... responsibility for dealing (9) ... poverty. The realisation of human rights — including the fight against poverty — is a duty, not a mere aspiration.

48. Fill in the gaps in the text with the correct forms of the words.
CAREER CHOICE
A career development professional will use various tools to help you evaluate your interests, personality, (8) ... and values.

49. The sun … brightly all day on the roof of my attic, and the room was warm.

50. It … outside; I do not like to walk in such weather.

51. Water … at 100 degrees.

52. The boy sitting next to me on the plane was nervous because he … before.

53. Read the texts again and decide which text mentions that homemaking ...
has become a worthwhile career.

54. The biggest concern about people using the internet is … addicted to it.

55. In recent years, scientific and technological developments … human life on our planet, as well as our views both of ourselves as individuals in society and of the universe as a whole.

56. Read the texts and match them with the headings. There is one extra title.
«I don't know how you stay at home all day... I would be bored out of my mind», was a comment I often heard when I stayed at home. Was I bored? Never! I mastered the housework so that I wasn't a slave to it. Obviously, there was the cleaning to be done regularly but it was the sharing of the tidying up that made the difference. My family learnt to tidy up after themselves and if there was a bit of accumulated dust it would wait until the end of the week when a day was set aside for a thorough cleaning. I established a routine for the necessary chores that had to be done daily, but if they weren't completed by lunchtime, they were left until the next day. That way I had time to pursue my own interests and to spend time with the children as well.
a) The perfect job b) Never bored c) Exhausting for all d) Money or time? e) A role reversal f) Free evenings

57. Read the texts and match them with the headings. There is one extra title.
So, after my first baby arrived, I felt for years that I had the perfect job. I was my own boss. I could work when I wanted and have a rest when I wanted. If I didn't feel like cleaning or doing the shopping and wanted to have a day off, that was fine. Nobody else would have to be asked to cover for me, my work could wait until I was ready to do it. Oh yes, it was hard work taking care of our home and our children and the hours were long, but the work was varied and very rewarding. In fact, being a homemaker was the perfect job for me. I was absolutely happy being a housewife and mum. Watching my children thrive, witnessing their first steps, hearing their first words and all the other milestones were worth more than any amount of money..
a) The perfect job b) Never bored c) Exhausting for all d) Money or time? e) A role reversal f) Free evenings

58. Although the period that we call «the Renaissance» … in Italy in the fourteenth century, this idea of rebirth in learning characterized other epochs in history in different parts of the world.

59. Fill in the gaps in the text with the correct forms of the words.
CAREER CHOICE
At the same time, remember that money is also important for you need it to survive. So, if a job is all … but no pay, things can get difficult.

60. I … when my friend … .

61. Read the text and complete the gaps in the sentences with the words from the text. The Irish Travellers are the largest minority in Ireland. There are about 25,000 Irish Travellers in Ireland and 1,300 in Northern Ireland. They are a little understood nomadic community, who have many difficulties to overcome if they are to survive as a culture and gain acceptance into Irish society. Among the challenges facing them are poverty and racism. The Irish Travellers are a distinct ethnic group which has existed for centuries. Often they are mistakenly considered part of the nomadic Romani, an ethnic group which originated in the region of India and is now widespread throughout Europe. But the Irish Travellers are indigenous to Ireland, so the two cultures are not related. While both are nomadic, the Irish Travellers are Roman Catholic and speak a language that is theirs alone. They have their own culture, customs, traditions, and language. They are noted for their musical and storytelling abilities. In times past, they travelled by horse-drawn wagon in caravans, making camp along the way. Tinsmithing, horse trading and peddling were the major sources of income in those days. Tinsmiths were so prevalent among Irish Travellers that the terms Tinker and Irish Traveller were used interchangeably. Today, Tinker is one of many names for Irish Travellers. Horses and wagons have given way to mobile homes pulled by motor vehicles. They continue their life on the road, but there are fewer places to stop and fewer places where they are welcome. Today, Irish Travellers mainly work in recycling. Changing needs of society and progress have eliminated the jobs that could support a culture on wheels. Irish Travellers are poor, undereducated, and on the receiving end of discrimination. Their life expectancy is lower than average while their infant mortality rate is higher than average. As is the case with the Romani, the Irish Travellers are seen by many as a group of immoral, ignorant criminals and con artists. People distrust their nomadic culture and their language, Shelta. Many think it's a secret language specifically developed as a tool to help the Irish Travellers trick innocent people. But this is not true. It is an old language, which has evolved with time and circumstances. Once heavily infused with Irish Gaelic, it is now infused with English.
People distrust their ... and ...

62. Read the text and choose the best options to fill in the gaps.
HUMAN RIGHTS DAY On 10 December 1948, the United Nations General Assembly adopted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, which has become a (1) ... standard for defending and promoting human rights. Every year on 10 December, Human Rights Day marks the adoption of the Universal Declaration which states that «Human beings are born with (2) ... rights and fundamental freedoms». In 2006, Human Rights Day focused on (3) ... poverty as a matter of obligation, not of charity. Poverty is (4) ... by human rights violations. The links between human rights and poverty should be obvious: people whose rights are (5) ... are more likely to be poor. Generally they find it harder or impossible to participate in the labour market and have little or no access to (6) ... services and resources. Meanwhile, the poor in many societies cannot enjoy their rights to education, health and housing simply (7) ... they cannot afford them. And poverty affects all human rights: for example, low income can prevent people from accessing education, which in turn inhibits their participation in public life and their ability to influence the policies affecting them. Governments and those in a position of authority must (8) ... responsibility for dealing (9) ... poverty. The realisation of human rights — including the fight against poverty — is a duty, not a mere aspiration.

63. Check to see if the job gives you what you want from a career. Passion is the key word in selecting a career. Select something because you feel passionate about it, not because it is the latest thing in the job market.
Read the text and choose the best options to fill in the gaps.
WIND ENERGY
Every day you can see the wind blowing and watch all of that wasted energy just floating away. A lot of energy is thought to be (25) ... and all you need to use it are a few wind turbines! Currently less than 1% of the Earth's energy needs are (26) ... by wind, with Denmark being the most wind-friendly producing 23% of its own energy needs from wind. The energy produced is totally clean and also one of the (27) ... around and it is able to produce (28) ... 18 times more energy than is consumed in its construction, (29) ... nuclear which is estimated at around five. People are often worried about the look of wind farms but what they often forget is that the land can still (30) ... for farming, with only 1% of the space being taken up by the wind turbines. One of the biggest (31) ... about wind turbines, is their effect on bats and birds. In Norway, nine out of ten sea eagles were killed by turbines. Bats too are a serious problem. Even the manufacturers of wind turbines are (32). concerned by the numbers of bats being. killed, prompting ongoing research.

64. Fill in the gaps in the text with the correct forms of the words.
CAREER CHOICE
Before you start choosing a perfect career, you need to know yourself first. But sometimes all this self-analysis leads to ... .

65. I … for a whole hour!

66. I feel terrible. I think I … to be sick.

67. Read the texts again and decide which text mentions that homemaking ...
helped someone to pursue his/her own interests.

68. My colleagues usually … four days a week, and tills week they … five days.

69. Read the text and choose the best options to fill in the gaps.
HUMAN RIGHTS DAY
On 10 December 1948, the United Nations General Assembly adopted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, which has become a (1) ... standard for defending and promoting human rights. Every year on 10 December, Human Rights Day marks the adoption of the Universal Declaration which states that «Human beings are born with (2) ... rights and fundamental freedoms». In 2006, Human Rights Day focused on (3) ... poverty as a matter of obligation, not of charity. Poverty is (4) ... by human rights violations. The links between human rights and poverty should be obvious: people whose rights are (5) ... are more likely to be poor. Generally they find it harder or impossible to participate in the labour market and have little or no access to (6) ... services and resources. Meanwhile, the poor in many societies cannot enjoy their rights to education, health and housing simply (7) ... they cannot afford them. And poverty affects all human rights: for example, low income can prevent people from accessing education, which in turn inhibits their participation in public life and their ability to influence the policies affecting them. Governments and those in a position of authority must (8) ... responsibility for dealing (9) ... poverty. The realisation of human rights — including the fight against poverty — is a duty, not a mere aspiration.

70. Turning from the Temple gate as soon as I … the warning, I … my way to Fleet Street, and then … to Covent Garden.

71. Fill in the gaps in the text with the correct forms of the verbs.
Dear Sarah. Thank, you for your Letter which I (o) received last week. It was really good to hear from you. You said you ... Anton recently but you didn’t say how he was.

72. Check to see if the job gives you what you want from a career. Passion is the key word in selecting a career. Select something because you feel passionate about it, not because it is the latest thing in the job market. Read the text and choose the best options to fill in the gaps. WIND ENERGY Every day you can see the wind blowing and watch all of that wasted energy just floating away. A lot of energy is thought to be (25) ... and all you need to use it are a few wind turbines! Currently less than 1% of the Earth's energy needs are (26) ... by wind, with Denmark being the most wind-friendly producing 23% of its own energy needs from wind. The energy produced is totally clean and also one of the (27) ... around and it is able to produce (28) ... 18 times more energy than is consumed in its construction, (29) ... nuclear which is estimated at around five. People are often worried about the look of wind farms but what they often forget is that the land can still (30) ... for farming, with only 1% of the space being taken up by the wind turbines. One of the biggest (31) ... about wind turbines, is their effect on bats and birds. In Norway, nine out of ten sea eagles were killed by turbines. Bats too are a serious problem. Even the manufacturers of wind turbines are (32).
concerned by the numbers of bats being. killed, prompting ongoing research.

73. Fill in the gaps in the text with the correct forms of the verbs.
I hope you haven’t changed your mind. Don’t forget to bring some warm clothes as it gets really cold in winter. If you … I'll show you around. There's an awful lot to see.

74. We went into the house by a side door and the first thing I … was that the passages … all dark, and that she … a candle burning there.

75. Fill in the gaps in the text with the correct forms of the words.
CAREER CHOICE
Making a career choice is one of the most difficult and most important (0) decisions we will ever make in our lives. It has to be made with much … and deliberation.

76. Fill in the gaps in the text with the correct forms of the verbs in brackets.
The internet (0) has changed people's life dramatically. It has allowed people from all over the world … with each other and express their ideas and opinions.

77. Long ago they … most houses out of wood.

78. Read the text and complete the gaps in the sentences with the words from the text. The Irish Travellers are the largest minority in Ireland. There are about 25,000 Irish Travellers in Ireland and 1,300 in Northern Ireland. They are a little understood nomadic community, who have many difficulties to overcome if they are to survive as a culture and gain acceptance into Irish society. Among the challenges facing them are poverty and racism. The Irish Travellers are a distinct ethnic group which has existed for centuries. Often they are mistakenly considered part of the nomadic Romani, an ethnic group which originated in the region of India and is now widespread throughout Europe. But the Irish Travellers are indigenous to Ireland, so the two cultures are not related. While both are nomadic, the Irish Travellers are Roman Catholic and speak a language that is theirs alone. They have their own culture, customs, traditions, and language. They are noted for their musical and storytelling abilities. In times past, they travelled by horse-drawn wagon in caravans, making camp along the way. Tinsmithing, horse trading and peddling were the major sources of income in those days. Tinsmiths were so prevalent among Irish Travellers that the terms Tinker and Irish Traveller were used interchangeably. Today, Tinker is one of many names for Irish Travellers. Horses and wagons have given way to mobile homes pulled by motor vehicles. They continue their life on the road, but there are fewer places to stop and fewer places where they are welcome. Today, Irish Travellers mainly work in recycling. Changing needs of society and progress have eliminated the jobs that could support a culture on wheels. Irish Travellers are poor, undereducated, and on the receiving end of discrimination. Their life expectancy is lower than average while their infant mortality rate is higher than average. As is the case with the Romani, the Irish Travellers are seen by many as a group of immoral, ignorant criminals and con artists. People distrust their nomadic culture and their language, Shelta. Many think it's a secret language specifically developed as a tool to help the Irish Travellers trick innocent people. But this is not true. It is an old language, which has evolved with time and circumstances. Once heavily infused with Irish Gaelic, it is now infused with English.
They were called Tinkers, which is now ... for them.

79. Read the text and complete the gaps in the sentences with the words from the text. The Irish Travellers are the largest minority in Ireland. There are about 25,000 Irish Travellers in Ireland and 1,300 in Northern Ireland. They are a little understood nomadic community, who have many difficulties to overcome if they are to survive as a culture and gain acceptance into Irish society. Among the challenges facing them are poverty and racism. The Irish Travellers are a distinct ethnic group which has existed for centuries. Often they are mistakenly considered part of the nomadic Romani, an ethnic group which originated in the region of India and is now widespread throughout Europe. But the Irish Travellers are indigenous to Ireland, so the two cultures are not related. While both are nomadic, the Irish Travellers are Roman Catholic and speak a language that is theirs alone. They have their own culture, customs, traditions, and language. They are noted for their musical and storytelling abilities. In times past, they travelled by horse-drawn wagon in caravans, making camp along the way. Tinsmithing, horse trading and peddling were the major sources of income in those days. Tinsmiths were so prevalent among Irish Travellers that the terms Tinker and Irish Traveller were used interchangeably. Today, Tinker is one of many names for Irish Travellers. Horses and wagons have given way to mobile homes pulled by motor vehicles. They continue their life on the road, but there are fewer places to stop and fewer places where they are welcome. Today, Irish Travellers mainly work in recycling. Changing needs of society and progress have eliminated the jobs that could support a culture on wheels. Irish Travellers are poor, undereducated, and on the receiving end of discrimination. Their life expectancy is lower than average while their infant mortality rate is higher than average. As is the case with the Romani, the Irish Travellers are seen by many as a group of immoral, ignorant criminals and con artists. People distrust their nomadic culture and their language, Shelta. Many think it's a secret language specifically developed as a tool to help the Irish Travellers trick innocent people. But this is not true. It is an old language, which has evolved with time and circumstances. Once heavily infused with Irish Gaelic, it is now infused with English.
The Irish Travellers are mistakenly taken for the nomadic Romani, another ... widely spread in Europe.

80. I … here all my life.

81. Choose the right variant. How long … you …? — Since I was 17.

82. Read the texts again and decide which text mentions that homemaking ... was easier than combining full-time work and housework.

Другие тесты Синергии:

Организация, нормирование и материальное стимулирование труда в машиностроении

Финансовые менеджмент (2)

Международное право

Инструментальные средства информационных систем

Инженерно-техническая защита информации

Имитационное моделирование экономических процессов

Информационные системы управления эффективностью бизнеса — BPM системы